Special Sessions

Special Sessions

General Theme: The healthy river

1. Instream wood: restoration opportunities, flood-related hazards, and management practices

Organizers:

  • Ruiz-Villanueva, V. (Swiss Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland)
  • Bladé, E. (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain)
  • Rickenmann, D. (WSL, Switzerland)
  • Weitbrecht, V. (Swiss Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland)
  • Boes, R. (Swiss Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland)
  • Schalko, I. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, US).

Instream wood (i.e., trees, trunks, branches and roots) is an important, but still incompletely quantified component of river ecosystems. Instream wood has positive effects on channel morphodynamics and freshwater biodiversity. Despite these benefits, rivers are generally lacking instream wood, with significant impacts on the ecosystem and functioning. Therefore, instream wood is being widely used and reintroduced in rivers as a restoration measure. However, when large quantities of wood are transported during flood events, it can represent a substantial hazard, by increasing the destructive power of floods, as driftwood may affect infrastructures such as bridges, weirs, etc. 

The session will focus on the different aspects of wood in rivers, including the interactions between flow, sediment, and wood, potential flood-related hazards and risks, monitoring of wood transport, estimation of wood budget, analysis of wood recruitment, use of wood as a river restoration technique, etc. But also, on the latest advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational tools used in the analysis of wood in rivers, such as field surveying, mapping, tracking, remote sensing, physical and numerical modelling, etc. Different management strategies and experiences in rivers worldwide are most welcome to promote the debate about best practices regarding wood in rivers. 

General Theme: The healthy river

2. Monitoring in ecohydraulic research: new developments in facing the challenges of scales

Organizers:

  • Markus Noack (Karlsruhe University of Applied Science, markus.noack@hs.karlsruhe.de)
  • Jeffrey Tuhtan (Tallinn University of Technology, jeffrey.tuhtan@taltech.ee)
  • Shinji Fukuda (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, shinji-f@cc.tuat.ac.jp)
  • Margaret Chen (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, margaret.chen@vub.ac.be)

Monitoring and measuring for ecohydraulic research is challenging due to the requirement of measuring abiotic and biotic parameters across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Major knowledge gaps exist relating large-scale processes at the basin scale (e.g. hydrologic and sediment regimes) to micro-scale processes such as colmation and the dissolved oxygen supply for reproduction processes of gravel-spawning fish. Similar linkages exist across temporal scales, considering the long-term effects posed by climate change and their influence on short-term, local flow turbulence.

To capture the broad range of spatial and temporal scales, new approaches in sampling, measuring and monitoring are required. In this special session, we will discuss not only methods but also the requirements on accuracy, available personal and monetary resources as well as on the objectives of the research. We welcome any research related to innovative measuring techniques, sampling procedures or data handling methods which can address challenging scale-issues in ecohydraulic research.

Theme: Digital river

3. The future of river modelling

Organizers:

  • Mohamed Yossef (Deltares) 
  • Erik Mosselman (Deltares)

 Physics-based numerical modelling of rivers has reached a high level of sophistication. Actions and recommendations abound for further development of these models towards perfection. However, new ‘disruptive’ technologies for data-driven modelling, remote sensing, web harvesting and genetic algorithms could revolutionize the current lines of model development. Moreover, modelling rivers is no longer a job for experts only. Increased accessibility and ease-of-use open avenues for interactive modelling, community modelling, sharing, citizen science, and accessibility for all. The trends from physics-based to data-driven modelling and from expert to non-expert model users inevitably change river modelling as we know it. 

For this special session, we invite visionary contributions as well as concrete case studies and proofs of concept regarding new technologies for modelling rivers. The session will offer time too for a debate on river modelling in the future.

 

Theme: Climate change and extreme events

4. Recent advances in characterization and modelling of floods from multiple sources

 Organizers:

  • Vasilis Bellos (Laboratory of Reclamations Works and Water Resources Management, School of Rural and Surveying Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece.)
  • María Bermúdez (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Group, Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. )

Many urban areas located along rivers are at risk of flooding not only from high river flows but from other multiple sources, phenomenon which is typically known as compound flooding. The term multiple sources mainly refers to the combination of the following types: a) fluvial flooding where the source is the river discharge; b) pluvial flooding associated with rainfall-generated runoff; and c) coastal flooding where the main sources are the tide and storm surge. Single-source assessments, where only the primary flood source is analysed or each one is analysed separately, neglect interactions and dependencies between sources, and are thus likely to underestimate flood risks. In this Special Session, we invite papers dealing with recent advances in understanding and modelling of floods caused by multiple sources. Multivariate analysis for characterizing compound events and new flood inundation modelling approaches combining the effect of multiple sources are particularly welcome.

 

Theme: River fundamentals

5. Advances in Large-scale Hydraulic Experiments 

Organizers:

  • Hong-Koo Yeo (Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology) 
  • Ellis Penning (Deltares, The Netherlands),

Using laboratory flumes for investigating various phenomena occurring in natural rivers is commonplace. However, it is difficult to counterbalance the scale effect of a wide variety of hydraulics and ecological phenomena including sedimentation, aquatic flora and fauna, and associated habitats in such small scale laboratory flumes. Full-scale hydraulic experiments in the field can avoid such significant scale effects, but field conditions might not necessarily be easy to control, and these types of experiments are difficult to replicate. Analysis results obtained from large-scale experimental facilities can assist ecological and river researchers in examining natural phenomena on a near-real scale condition that is still fully controlled and can be repeated if desired. This can aid in developing more robust validation data for designing optimal water management solutions.

In this special session, recent advances in large-scale hydraulic experiments will be presented with objectives to improve better understanding of the complex interactions between hydraulics, geomorphic evolution and biologic responses, and to demonstrate actual applications. We welcome the latest research associated with hydraulic and eco-hydraulic experiments conducted in large-scale experimental facilities.

Theme: River fundamentals

6. Scour at In-stream Hydraulic Structures

Organizers:

  • Brian M. Crookston (Utah Water Research Laboratory, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Utah State University. Logan, Utah).    
  • Michele Palermo (Dept. of Energy, Systems, Territory and Construction Engineering, University of Pisa. Pisa, Italy).  michele.palermo@unipi.it

The majority of rivers throughout the world have been impacted through the construction of in-stream structures. These structures are diverse in purpose (thalweg control, bank protection, river restoration, aquatics connectivity, navigation, flood control, etc.), placement and design (full-width, unsubmerged, submerged, etc.), and even of the selected construction materials (rock, concrete, wood). Examples range from spurs, barbs, sills, vanes, various types of weirs, and log structures to fishways, energy dissipators, culverts, dams, gates, and bridges.  Two common considerations and challenging issues for all in-stream structures are the potential for local scour and the necessity to couple hydraulic functioning with impact minimization on the natural contexts. We therefore propose this special session where papers focused on scour development and physical processes, prediction approaches, methods of reduction or protection, or case studies would for a collection on this specific topic.

Theme: River fundamentals

7. Instrumentation in river engineering and monitoring of geomorphic processes

 Organizers:

  • Rui Miguel Ferreira (IST-ID, Civil Engineering, architecture and Georesources, Engenharia Civil, Arquitectura e Georrecursos, Portugal, ruif@civil.ist.utl.pt) 
  • Manousos Valyrakis (University of Glasgow, School of Engineering, Infrastructure and Environment Research Division, United Kingdom, manousos.valyrakis@glasgow.ac.uk)

Advances in hardware and software have widened the range of tools and methods available to measure key flow variables in fluvial and other natural or built environments. Nowadays, a range of laser (3D LDV, stereo-PIV), acoustic (ADV, ADCP, ABS) and ultrasonics (UVP), are typically deployed towards obtaining flow field variables, at a high spatiotemporal resolution. In addition, stone tracing (RFID), particle instrumentation (MEMS) and optical methods (PTV, LSPIV), allow from directly assessing particle transport to indirectly measuring flow field quantities. Laser-based scanning methods and advances in photogrammetry (structure from motion) are commonly used to reconstruct detailed riverbed morphologies and water surface geometries. 

This session aims at bringing together researchers developing or using non-intrusive flow measuring techniques, including but not limited to the methods described above, finding a breadth of important applications, from the micro to the reach scale, in virtually all fields of river hydraulics and environmental fluid mechanics.

Theme: Digital river

8. Advanced methods in turbulence modelling of fluvial systems

Organizers:

  • Fabian Bombardelli (University of California Davis, fabombardelli@ucdavis.edu)
  • Carlo Gualtieri (University of Naples “Federico II”, carlo.gualtieri@unina.it)
  • Daniel Valero (IHE Delft Institute for Water Education, d.valero@un-ihe.org)

River systems encompass a wide range of flow spatial and time scales, together with changing external and internal forcing mechanisms, complex boundaries and moving interfaces. Despite the tremendous progresses in the last decades, the interaction of flow with sediments, vegetation and the breaking free surface still limits the accurate numerical simulation of fluvial processes. Whereas numerical modelling allows large flexibility and access to detailed information, more cutting-edge computing facilities and novel codes are needed to perform high-fidelity numerical simulations.

This special session will focus on advances related to the accurate numerical simulation of turbulent processes in rivers. Studies presented herein will directly contribute to move the frontier of the knowledge on hydrodynamics, mixing and sediment transport in natural and built environments, and/or present significant contributions in flow modelling aiming to unfold the complicated nature of river flows.

General Theme: The healthy river

9. Basin-scale sediment fluxes observations

Organizers:

  • Carmelo Juez (carmelo.juez@upm.es – Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC, Spain)
  • Estela Nadal-Romero (estelanr@ipe.csic.es – Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC, Spain)
  • Marwan Hassan (marwan.hassan@geog.ubc.ca – Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Canada)
  • Damià Vericat (dvericat@macs.udl.cat – Department of Environment and Soil Sciences, University of Lleida, Spain)

Sediment transport is the mayor driver of changes in most river basin systems. Beyond landscape evolution and river geomorphology, sediment dynamics are an important component of a number of physical, chemical and biological processes in river basins. Sediments thus impact the ecology of rivers, sustainability of human infrastructure and basin level fluxes of nutrients and carbon. However, the heterogeneity of the landscape, in terms of geology, soil type, topography, land use, and precipitation regime, at the river basin scale makes difficult to clearly identify the variables that control the sediment dynamics in such river basins.

For this special session, we invite studies dealing with field and experimental observations of sediment fluxes at basin scale as well as case studies and new techniques for measuring and modelling such sediment fluxes. We welcome interdisciplinary research aim at linking sediment dynamics with bio-chem-hydraulic observations.